Live Chat
enquiry

Select School

Editors

Executive Editor:

Dr. Vibhuti Sachdev
Professor and Dean, Sushant School of Art and Architecture
Ansal University, Gurgaon

Editor:

Dr. Ila Gupta
Professor, Sushant School of Art and Architecture
Ansal University, Gurgaon

Associate Editor:

Sylvie Dominique
Associate Professor, Sushant School of Art and Architecture
Ansal University, Gurgaon

Team:

Mark Warner (Cover Design)
Neha Mallick (Design and Layout)

 

Editorial Advisory Board

  1. Adam Hardy, Professor of Asian Architecture, The Welsh School of Architecture,  Cardiff University
  2. Amit Srivastava, Senior Lecturer, University of Adelaide, Australia
  3. Anupam Bansal, Principal, ABRD Architects, New Delhi, India
  4. Hina Zia, Dean, Faculty of Architecture and Ekistics, Jamia Milia Islamia University, New Delhi
  5. Kaiwan Mehta, Author and Managing Editor- DOMUS India
  6. Peter Scriver, Associate Professor, University of Adelaide, Australia
  7. Rajeev Lunkad, Founder DirectCreate, Head of Strategy- Home & Lifestyle SBU, Fabindia Overseas Pvt Ltd, Gurgaon, India
  8. Ravi Gundu Rao, RGRA – Consultant Architectural Conservation of Heritage Buildings & Sites, Mysore, India
  9. Roger Connah, Associate Professor, Azrieli School of Architecture & Urbanism, Carleton University, Canada; Visiting Professor: Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou, China
  10. Rohit Jigyasu, UNESCO Chair Professor, Institute of Disaster Mitigation for Urban Cultural Heritage, Ritsumeikan University
  11. Sanjay Kanvinde, Kanvinde, Rai & Chowdhury, Connaught Place, New Delhi , India
  12. Sanjay Prakash, Principal, SHiFt- Studio for Habitat Studies, New Delhi, India
  13. Sushant Varma, Co-founder & Design Head at rat[LAB] - Research in Architecture & Technology, New Delhi, India
  14. Tanmay Tathagat, Executive Director, Environmental Design Solutions [EDS], New Delhi, India
  15. Usha Iyer, Associate Professor, RMIT University, Australia
  16. Vikas Dilawari, Vikas Dilawari Conservation Architect, Mumbai, India.

 

Foreword from the Vice Chancellor

I am delighted to know that the journal ‘Veranda: Journal of Sushant School of Art and Architecture’ is now a reality. Sushant School of Art and Architecture, Ansal University was established in 1989 and has a long history of academic excellence. Having one of the most successful B. Arch Programmes, the School has now expanded and has many under graduate and post graduate programmes viz. M. Arch (Urban Design), M. Arch. (Built Heritage), M. Arch. (Landscape Architecture), M. Arch. (Interior Architecture), and B.Sc (Building Projects). The University has also recently launched Sushant School of Planning and Development offering programmes like B.Plan, B.Plan (Sustainable), M.Plan (Urban Planning), M.Plan. (Transport Planning) and M.Plan (Policy and Governance). Ansal University has a rigorous PhD programme wherein many scholars are presently registered for various architecture, design and planning subjects.

Located in the heart of Gurgaon, Ansal University has eight schools offering programmes in Architecture, Design, Law, Management, Hospitality, Engineering and Health Sciences and Planning & Development and emphasizes on Inter and Trans-disciplinary approach to learning and research. The University has been awarded the National Education Excellence award “Best Private University in Northern India 2017” along with “CSR Excellence in Education” award for two consecutive years i.e. 2017 and 2018.

The University has always emphasized on research based learning with practical applications. Our Sushant School of art and architecture has taken it a step further by publishing this international peer reviewed journal. I see that the inaugural issue of the journal includes eight inspiring vision papers which define the distinctiveness of this journal and set the stage for subsequent issues. Articles published in this journal are likely to remain important means of distributing research findings in the foreseeable future. The time when Veranda is being published is extremely appropriate. While the entire world is working on sustainability, India has given a big push to urbanization and smart cites. New technologies, new construction materials and the innate desire of human to find their identities in heritage and culture of built environments has opened up new areas of inter-disciplinary research. It is my earnest hope that this Journal will prove to be a very effective platform for disseminating contemporary research and provide a great learning experience for all the built environment professionals.

I would like to congratulate the Veranda team of Sushant School of Art and Architecture who made this potentially influential journal happen.

 

Dean’s Note

An Indo-Portuguese word dating back to the 18th Century, Veranda resonates in Hindi and Urdu with baraṇḍā "roofed gallery," Marathi varãḍ, varãḍā "parapet," and echoes back to Sanskrit varaṇḍaka: "mound of earth, rampart separating two fighting elephants." Veranda: is the inaugural interdisciplinary journal of Architecture, Planning, Art and Design published by Sushant School of Art and Architecture, Ansal University. A hybrid journal of texts, essays, papers, critical commentaries and reviews, it explores a new writing and research on architecture where connections to urbanism, planning and pedagogy re-think text and image. From the rich varied content of the inaugural edition Veranda: (colon) makes a case for hybridity aiming to present dialogues in architecture always about to happen. This is a journal-in-flux responding to current but changing issues, in Gurgaon, India, and beyond. With a distinctive graphic identity and layout, the journal appeals to both international and Indian readers, re-assessing language, topic, theme and image. Something of the moment yet also academic, something respecting the pull of tradition and heritage but situated in the contemporary, even “speculative globalism’ of current India. Veranda: defines its own difference and appeal to language (image and text) by including the silent and uncertain issues as yet not spoken about.

 

Editorial
(Vol. 1, Issue 1)

India, known for its rich heritage and culture, has equally rich history of education too. Interactive learning has always been a norm in India. Taking this ideology, Sushant School of Art and Architecture is proud to launch ‘Veranda: Journal of Sushant School of Art and Architecture’, an international peer reviewed annual journal which provides a forum for academic and evidence based research, theory and discussion in the field of Art, Architecture and Planning. The journal endeavours to establish strong academic and applied debates and expects a good international circulation. Veranda aims to connect the world of academia, both theoretical perspectives and research agendas with the practice and industry of architecture and planning. This inaugural issue generates interesting ideas and debates on many vital topics.

In Pagodas, Pillars and Popular Cults, Julia H. B. Hegewald focuses on the distinctiveness of Jain bastis in southern and northern Kannada. Re-contextualising these bastis as structures generally attached to mathas, the author recalls the significant presence of Jain communities in the region.India, known for its rich heritage and culture, has equally rich history of education too. Interactive learning has always been a norm in India. Taking this ideology, Sushant School of Art and Architecture is proud to launch ‘Veranda: Journal of Sushant School of Art and Architecture’, an international peer reviewed annual journal which provides a forum for academic and evidence based research, theory and discussion in the field of Art, Architecture and Planning. The journal endeavours to establish strong academic and applied debates and expects a good international circulation. Veranda aims to connect the world of academia, both theoretical perspectives and research agendas with the practice and industry of architecture and planning. This inaugural issue generates interesting ideas and debates on many vital topics.

In Pagodas, Pillars and Popular Cults, Julia H. B. Hegewald focuses on the distinctiveness of Jain bastis in southern and northern Kannada. Re-contextualising these bastis as structures generally attached to mathas, the author recalls the significant presence of Jain communities in the region. Their economic and political influence resulted in royal, guild and private patronage of such monumental and wealthy complexes that, for most of them, predate the 13th century. However, the paper takes a particular interest in their formidable development during the Vijyanagara renaissance during the 15th and 16th centuries. Through extensive descriptions, she demonstrates how the climate of the southern Indian region of Karanataka and the syncretism of the Jain practices with local beliefs influenced the choice of materials, structural elements and iconography. The introduction of the pagoda roof reminiscent of the Himalayan and South-East Asian forms, the translation of wooden structures into stone, the extensive use of pillars to support circumambulatory passageways and the representation of local Naga deities on the sites, are as many characteristics that distinguish these still active temples in the Sub-continent architectural landscape.

Through the study of the Shiv Kund in Sohna, Gurgaon Parul Munjal addresses a critical hiatus in the process of conservation of architectural heritage and more particularly of living heritage in India, which is that of values in the approach of historical heritage. Located in Sonha in Guragon, the complex of Shiv Kund is a sacred site sought by the devotee for the therapeutic virtues of its hot water. As an active pilgrimage site, the complex is a living religious heritage contested between the Muslim and Hindu communities. Predating the period of Shahjahan, its different structures underwent several stylistic and historiographical changes made according to the contexts of their consecutive re-use, repairs and re-adaptation. Relying on fieldwork, archival research and more recent documentation, Parul Munjal traces back these different transformations. By the same she provides a clear picture of the different attitudes of the various stakeholders – from the management to the local devotee and the pilgrims – towards the site. The complexity of the coexisting significances that each attaches to the Shiv Kund, calls for a shift from a rigid legal and academic approach of the present agencies to a value-based perspective. While this debate has been addressed in the international realm the Indian sphere has remained hermetic to it.

Dr. Michael Karassowitsch through his article ‘Dusty Roads, broken systems and architecture’ is addressing the issues of dichotomy between the traditional Indian value system in architecture and the state of present architectural practices. Dr. Michael elaborates the role of the Sthapati who addresses the immeasurable aspirations of the mind based on P.K. Acharya’s interpretation and translation of ‘Mansara’ (comprehensive collation of the Vastushashtra). Role of Sthapaka, the architect of icons and loci for deities as to orient us to the dwelling of subtle capacities and functions. Dr. Michael emphasizes the need of materialist value of technological interventions in architectural professional practice to be replaced with architectural value based in mind and practice to prevent technology materialising in flaws and chaos.

Piyush Das, in Conch Shell shaped Sacred Landscape of Puri, explores the link between the physical and metaphysical plannings of the sacred land of Puri-Purushottam in Odisha, near Bubaneshvar. Puri is attested in many religious literary traditions. The sacred city is associated with Lord Vishnu said to have placed his Shankha there to commemorate his victory after he defeated the demon Gayasura. The author rigorously bases his study on Puranas to retrace the original topography of the region, describe the biodiversity of the city, map the religious infrastructures and the narrative associated with the region that contextualize the conch shell shape. Establishing a broad view of the landscape and beliefs allows him to investigate the different hypothetical processes by which the conch shell shape could have been formed. Piyush Das offers an interesting insight into cultural landscapes in India yet to be explored more extensively to understand the way beliefs, by encapsulating tangible topography and architecture, reveal the landscape’s metaphysical signification. Puri is one of the many sites where a belief system had both adapted to and changed the existing landscape, developing significant sacred cultural landscapes.

Form and contents are also reunited in Amrita Madan’s and Sindhuree Iyengar’s paper, Experiential Narratives as a Tool for Space Making. Defining Experiential Narrative as a combination between story-telling and sensorial participation, the two authors postulate that a space can be turned into a place if spatial narration is used in the process of making architecture. Analysing the application of such a concept at three different scales – through the respective acclaimed works of Peter Zumthor and Louis Khan, ephemeral installations and in training studio in which they both lead the experiment with their own students - they evaluate such a device as a powerful design tool both at a professional and academic levels. The paper invites the reader to look beyond the usual practice of architecture as an act of building an object with functional segregated areas. Shifting from this rather simplistic view, it considers the immersive character of experiential narrative as a potential additional layer in the creation process that would allow practitioners to navigate mentally and physically through a space from and in which stories of occupants unravels. In other word to think architecture not as buildings but as a multifaceted “space of stories”. The classical linear outside-inside perspective become then superseded by a more multidirectional approach that embraces the structure, its forms, volumes, light, materials, details, space, surrounding and time in a spatial continuum.

Sylvie Dominique in her article ‘Early Approaches to Heritage in Pre-Colonial India: Reconsidering The Eurocentric View of History of Built Heritage’ raises important questions and concerns over the practice of heritage conservation in India. The lack of awareness for heritage value and strategies for conservation are looked through the Eurocentric view. The focus of the paper is firstly on physical aspects like destruction, repairs, appropriation, abandon and reuse. Secondly, claim of legacy and thirdly the antiquarian appeal. Sylvie gives a comparative overview of conservation practices in India against the global view.
Prof. Amita Sinha’s article on ‘Waste Management on the Varanasi Ghats’ is based upon the field work conducted by the author for mapping waste and observations of cultural practices in Varanasi during 2013-16. The studies are based on Kevin Lynch’s ideas given in ‘Wasting away’. The author highlights the dichotomy between the cultural and religious importance of Ganga for its purifying powers and her divine ability to remove moral and physical dirt against the sad state of waste management leading to widespread environment pollution. This dissonance (between material and symbolic purity) does not result in deterrence to the continuity of traditional practices. The author maps the types of waste after qualitative surveys of 5 most important ghats – Assi, Manikarnika, Dashwamedh, Panchganga and Adi-Keshav. Author observes that waste recycling is a common practice in India, however much of the waste that flows in the river negatively impacts the river ecology. The paper suggests interesting, low cost, indigenous waste management options for maintaining the purity of ghats of Varanasi. The insight provided by the paper would enhance the spiritual experience offered by the place to the pilgrims.

Dr. Roger Connah’s article ‘The Anti-library or iDeath’ gives an interesting narrative of his journey of experiencing, expressing and writing architecture. The article starts with the introduction of pamphlets as short, quick compilations. Dr. Roger gives an account of 10 pamphlets that became the Anti-library. The journey started with writing Architecture Degree Zero in 2008 to iDeath in 2013. The ideas, impulses, inspirations during this mission are expressed as texts, plays, lectures, talks etc. The informal writing style makes the article thought-provoking and appealing.

Sushant School of Art and Architecture is thankful to all the contributors for their valued participation in starting this dialogue. We hope that the research and concerns highlighted in this issue will draw widespread attention at both global and local levels and will prove influential in bringing out positive changes in the built environment.

 

Dr. Ila Gupta

Sylvie Dominique

 

Contents

  1. Pagodas, Pillars and Popular Cults: The Jaina Bastis of Coastal Karnatak Author: Dr. Julia Hegewald
  2. Towards a Negotiated Heritage: The Case of Shiv Kund, Sohna Author: Parul Munjal
  3. Dusty Avenues, Broken Systems and Architecture Author: Dr. Michael Karassowitsch
  4. Sacred Landscape of Puri, Sankha Kshetra Author: Piyush Das
  5. Experiential Narrative as a Tool for Space Making Authors: Amrita Madan and Sindhuree Iyengar
  6. Early Approaches to Heritage in Pre-Colonial India Author: Sylvie Dominique
  7. Waste management on the Varanasi Ghats Author: Dr. Amita Sinha
  8. The Anti-Library or iDeath- Pamphlets & Architecture Author: Dr. Roger Connah

 

CALL FOR PAPERS


Veranda: Journal of Sushant School of Art and Architecture is an international peer reviewed annual journal published in February by Sushant School of Art and Architecture. It provides a forum for academic and evidence based research, theory and discussion in the field of Art, Architecture and Planning. The journal achieves a good international outreach among researchers, practitioners, students and teachers.

Veranda follows five essential themes viz. Sustainability, Heritage, Education, Art and aesthetics and Critical thinking. Pertaining to these themes, the journal’s scope covers all aspects of built environment including architecture, urban design, landscape architecture, built heritage, interior architecture, urban planning, arts and design etc.


Manuscript Submission:

• All editorial correspondence and the manuscripts submissions should be addressed to:
The Editor,
Dr. Ila Gupta
Professor,
Sushant School of Art and Architecture,
Ansal University,
Sector 55, Golf Course Road
Gurgaon, Haryana State 122003
India
Email: veranda@ansaluniversity.edu.in
• Electronic copies of the article to be sent through email. Please mention manuscript for submission in the subject line.
• Contributors must provide their affiliation, complete postal and email addresses and telephone numbers with their articles. If there are two or more authors, then the corresponding author’s name and address details must be specified clearly.
• All papers submitted to Veranda will go through a double blind review process as per the standard procedure. Only those papers/ articles which are complete in all respects and which meet the scholarly goals of Veranda will be considered for publication.
• Authors will be provided with a copyright form once the contribution is accepted for publication. The submission will be considered as final only after the filled-in and signed copyright form is received.
• If articles are accepted for publication, all information (figures, photographs, captions, article) is to be sent in a CD to the postal address of Veranda.
• There are no publication charges.


Manuscript Preparation:

• Articles should be no longer than 8,000 words, inclusive of abstract, references, notes, tables and figures.
• Abstract of 150-250 words and 4-6 keywords must be provided with the article.
• Book reviews should be 800-1000 words.
• Use British spellings instead of American spellings (e.g. ‘labour’ instead of labor, ‘programme’ instead of program, ‘centre’ instead of center etc)
• Use ‘Twentieth century’, ‘1970s’. Spell out numbers from one to nine, 10 and above to remain in figures. However, for exact measurements use only figures (4 km, 5 per cent). All measurements should be given in metric units. Use International number system (thousands and millions) instead of lakhs and crores.
• Only Good quality photographs in TIFF/EPS/JPEG format, min. 300 dpi. Should be included. All maps and sketches and their legends should be readable in greyscale as well.

• Plagiarism in any form constitutes a serious violation of the most basic principles of scholarly writing and cannot be tolerated.


References and Notes


Article should include in-text citations to other publications and end of the text reference list as per Harvard referencing style. All the references should be carefully checked for completeness, accuracy and consistency.

In-text citations (as per Howard style):


(Smith, 2004, p. 65); (Shaw & Garner, 2008, pp.60-82); (Barros et al., 2008); (Anonymous, 1995); (Sharma, 1996, 2008, in press); (Basu, 1992, Miller, 2005)

Reference list:

References should be arranged first alphabetically and then further sorted chronologically if necessary. More than one reference from the same author(s) in the same year must be identified by the letters 'a', 'b', 'c', etc., placed after the year of publication.

Book: Smith, L. (2006), Uses of Heritage, Routledge, London and New York.
Book chapter: Calabrese, F.A. (2005), "The early pathways: theory to practice – a continuum", in Stankosky, M. (Ed.), Creating the Discipline of Knowledge Management, Elsevier, New York, NY, pp. 15-20.
Journal article: Hellstorm, T. (2005) “A Decision Model for Involvement in Vulnerability Reduction”, Disaster Prevention and management, Vol. 14, No. 2, pp. 196 – 205

Notes should be numbered serially, the numbers embedded in the manuscript. The notes should be presented at the end of the article. Notes must contain more than a mere reference.

 

SUBSCRIPTION DETAILS


Veranda: Journal of Sushant School of Art and Architecture

Subscription Term 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year
Number of Issues 1 2 3
India Price ₹300 ₹600 ₹900
International Price US$ 10 US$ 20 US$ 30
International Price UK£ 6 UK£ 12 UK£ 18

The prices include postage.

The details regarding payments via cheque, demand draft and bank transfer will be updated shortly.